Indian Potato Cakes

Hey folks, it’s recipe time again.

Not that you haven’t already had a couple this month but both of those were little, product specific recipes I came up with on the fly. Today’s is a touch more thought out.

This time, we’ll be making one of the best carriers for sauces – Potato pancakes.

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Harissa Peppers

Twice in one weekend, eh? Who would have thought?

Well, I wasn’t planning on it but then I found these:

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Morrisons’ “Ghost Peppers” – Not the Bhut Jolokia we all know by that name but some pointy, white bells, intended to make cute little halloween ghosties with. Meant for stuffing.

Now, I might not normally be a fan of bell peppers, given how I tend to wake up the next day still tasting all the worst bits of them, but oranges and whites don’t have that effect on me. And the pointy ones are always a little nicer, anyway.

So I figured that I’d give them a go.

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Chipotle Lava Cake

Today it’s time for another weekend bonus recipe. A recipe that uses a little something I recently picked up from Dorset Chilli Shop.

poctli

Their Chilpōctli – A full flavoured chipotle extract that I’d highly recommend but that’s also so similar in heat and usage to Grim Reaper Foods’ milder extracts that it hardly warrants a full post.

It’s simply a great

6/10

Heat

item that, when used sparingly, adds a wonderful, rich, savoury, multi-layered chipotle taste to just about anything. Perfect for con carnes but also today’s dessert.

Because that’s what I’m using it for. Chocolate cake.

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Weird Food Week

Hello again everyone, I’m bringing my recipe forward a couple weeks this time to celebrate national curry week. Or is it national chocolate week?

God knows why we’re having both at once this year but I’ve had vague plans for chocolate curry for a long while so it’s about time that they saw metaphorical print.

It’s time I made a chocolate madras.

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Something Cheesy

I hope you’re all enjoying the start of your weekend. I know I am.

Why? Because I’m particularly happy with this month’s recipe.

It’s a common, highly popular, streetfood item, spiced up in my own signature style and, while it was never my intention for it to be such, it’s come out as another part-italian fusion food.

We’re talking scotch bonnet mozzarella sticks, using many of the same spices as a caribbean jerk.

They’re tasty, they’re savoury and they’re more representative of jamaican food than most of my past work has been. What’s not to love?

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Copenhagen Sensation

Hey folks, today I have something slightly special for you.

It’s a weekend bonus recipe, like I used to do, only rather more refined. It’s a rich and creamy linguine that’s a lot like a korma in some respects but, instead of heavily spiced it’s highly spicy, fairly fruity and just a little bit bright and floral.

Sounds good, right? Well, there’s a catch.

This special dish was a spur of the moment creation thought up when a rare chilli I’d long been after wound up falling into my clutches fresh and in dire need of use. It uses the bhut jolokia orange copenhagen chilli.

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Barbecue Bread

Hey there heat eaters, it’s nearing the end of another month so it’s time for another spicy recipe.

Recently, these have been part-chinese fusions but I’m taking a break from that today because someone, somewhere said “cornbread”.

Yes, sometimes that’s all it takes to inspire me. A single compound word.

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Penne A La China

Hey all. This month I wanted to re-explore the idea of mixing culinary cultures
so you can, should you want, consider the following recipe to be inspired by
may’s fruit risotto.

The link is tenuous at best, however, since the only thing these dishes really
have in common is that they’re both part-italian fusion foods. The risotto was a
fruity rice dish with japanese, moroccan and peruvian influences, while today’s
penne a la arrabiata is a more chinese take on a classic tomato-based pasta one.

Because I was looking at recipes and thinking about making a hotter version with
more interesting chillies when I realised that all the posher arrabiata sauces
added in red wine.

By swapping that out for a (rather cheaper) red wine vinegar and adding in a
little extra sugar, suddenly we have the beginnings of a tart yet sweet sweet
and sour. Which, of course, paves the way for us to use one of the few dried
chillies that are popular in chinese cooking.

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It’s Pancake Time!

Greetings, my fiery friends. It’s time for another weekend bonus recipe. A recipe that’s just too simple and product specific to take the main spot of a month but one well worth sharing, nonetheless.

A recipe made using Mr. Vikki’s Banana Habanero pickle.

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But, before we get into how it’s made, there’s something I’d like to say about the product itself.

When last I tried it, I was shocked by the heat of this sweet pickle. I rated it a three out of ten, despite my previous jars only warranting a one. That batch was far stronger than expected and now I know why.

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Formerly Mild

Hey everyone, this week it’s recipe week and I’d like to talk to you about one of my favourite curries.

The humble korma, however, doesn’t have the best of reputations, being considered both too mild and too desert-like to be called a “proper curry” by many.

It’s the sweet, rich, creamy, coconut-heavy and utterly chilli free dish used to introduce people to the spices of indian cuisine but, in my opinion, it’s a little more than that.

Made well, the almond, coconut and dairy base of this dish gives it the unique, rich, mild and milky flavour you might expect, ideal to be built upon with other things, such as its often quite complex spice palette. In fact, it’s a perfect carrier for these spices because, as with chilli, their flavours are mostly oil based, allowing them to be absorbed into the milk fats quite easily to spread throughout the meal.

But, depending on where you look, you’ll see many variations on the korma, some of which have rather different ideas on what flavours should permeate its thick, underlying sauce.

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