Seafarer’s Special

Arrr, me hearties, it be talk like a pirate day* and do yer know what that means?

It means it’s time t’ batten down the hatches an’ bring out the Reading Chilli Fest booty fer a special, themed review, featurin’ Simpson’s Seeds’ Funky Monkey.

2017-09-11 11.19.25

Because no salty see dog would be caught dead without such a loveable rapscallion on deck.

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Translated from Pirate

Greetings, spice lovers, today is talk like a pirate day* and I’m sure you know what that means.

It means it’s time for me to put in a little extra effort and bring you a themed review of another special Reading item.

But, this isn’t that review. This is a rough translation of it. The real review I wrote for you took far more time and effort, learning how to not only talk like a pirate but also spell so.

I would, therefore, love for you to check out today’s true post and appreciate my working hard for your amusement.

Some of you, however, may struggle to read its more seafaring speak so I have included this version for you. If you’re sure that you don’t wish to read this review the way it was intended then, by all means, read on.

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Penne A La China

Hey all. This month I wanted to re-explore the idea of mixing culinary cultures
so you can, should you want, consider the following recipe to be inspired by
may’s fruit risotto.

The link is tenuous at best, however, since the only thing these dishes really
have in common is that they’re both part-italian fusion foods. The risotto was a
fruity rice dish with japanese, moroccan and peruvian influences, while today’s
penne a la arrabiata is a more chinese take on a classic tomato-based pasta one.

Because I was looking at recipes and thinking about making a hotter version with
more interesting chillies when I realised that all the posher arrabiata sauces
added in red wine.

By swapping that out for a (rather cheaper) red wine vinegar and adding in a
little extra sugar, suddenly we have the beginnings of a tart yet sweet sweet
and sour. Which, of course, paves the way for us to use one of the few dried
chillies that are popular in chinese cooking.

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